HORSES IN TRAINING MIGHT BE EATING MORE STARCH THAN THEY CAN EFFECTIVELY DIGEST

This could be a lost opportunity to harness more energy from feed.

It might also have dangerous consequences.

A RACEHORSE'S STARCH INTAKE
  • The intake of starch for a horse in training is highly variable. 
  • The upper safe limit for starch is set at 2g/kg of bodyweight per meal. The safe limit refers to risks associated with ulceration and acidosis.
  • The ideal target intake for reduction of risk is 1g/kg/bodyweight of starch or less. 
  • A higher intake of starch overwhelms the small intestine and causes starch spill-over into the large intestine.
  • Conversion of starch to glucose in the small intestine is a more effective energy production pathway than fermentation in the large intestine.
  • Disordered fermentation (malfermentation) of starch in the large intestine lowers pH causing acidosis and associated disorders.
TYPICAL STARCH INTAKE OF HORSES IN TRAINING
  • Examples of a 500kg horse in training based on 3 different feeds of differing starch levels
  • For a 500kg horse the upper safe limit is 1000g of starch per meal with an ideal upper intake of 500g of starch per meal
  • The high requirement for energy of a horse in training and volume of feed required to meet that need easily results in a starch intake that is above the ideal intake

Figures in red show that the ideal intake of 500g of starch per meal has been exceeded

34% Starch Racing Feed

34 percent starch racehorse feed

27% Starch Racing Feed

27 percent starch racehorse feed

20% Starch Racing Feed

20 percent starch racehorse feed
RISKS OF UNDIGESTED STARCH
  • Starch can overload the large intestine even when digested optimally
  • Inefficiently digested starch reaching the large intestine is fermented and may decrease the pH level causing lactic acidosis in the hindgut
  • The effects of acidosis may include reduced feed conversion, behavioural changes and conditions such as metabolic acidosis and laminitis
HELPING A HORSE DIGEST STARCH OPTIMALLY
  • The horse produces a low level of amylase in comparison to other species
  • Having evolved to live on a fibre based diet, the equine digestive system is not designed for efficient processing of the starchy substances which form the core of racing diets
  • The addition of enzymes to the diet provides the missing link in adapting to a higher starch and lower fibre diet

EquiNectar is an ideal and simple-to-feed source of digestive enzymes that can help a horse digest starch more effectively

Digestive enzymes for horses to help digest starch optimally

TESTIMONIALS

“This product is backed up by great science which is what led me to try it. I believe that the horses are looking and eating better than ever and since we started using it last year our horses have been running consistently well.”

ED WALKER

Ed Walker Racing

TESTIMONIALS

“We have just had a record breaking season, we strategically placed a number of horses on EquiNectar. EquiNectar really encourages my horses to eat well in addition to using their food in a more efficient way, as a result the are in excellent condition and ready to win.”

STUART WILLIAMS

Diomed Stables

TESTIMONIALS

“Vital to our yard routine, EquiNectar keeps horses consistent, consistently”

LUCA CUMANI

Cumani Racing

TESTIMONIALS

“A game changer in the narrow margin world of horse racing.” 

SIMON ROWLANDS

Rowlands Racing & Research Ltd